Jul 7, 2017

PSYCHOLOGY OF COERCIVE CONTROL - New postgraduate course aimed at understanding coercive control.

September 2017

Now accepting applications for September 2017

University of Salford, Manchester

http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/psychology-of-coercive-control

MSC/PGDIP/PGCERT

School - School of Health Sciences
Subject area - Psychology

IN BRIEF:

  • You will develop an advanced understanding of the psychology of coercive control and cutting edge research and practice in this area
  • You will gain a deep appreciation of contemporary approaches to the prevention of and recovery from coercive control and abuse in domestic settings, in trafficking and in organisations more widely
  • You will be supported by a highly qualified and experienced team of professional staff in advancing your career in a variety of ‘in demand’ professions relating to coercion and abuse or towards a professional doctorate in psychology or related disciplines

COURSE SUMMARY

This course provides advanced insights and knowledge of cutting edge practice and research about coercive control and behaviour and its development and effects on individuals, families and organisations. You will develop a deep understanding of the psychological processes involved in coercive and controlling behaviour across a variety of settings including in domestic relationships, human trafficking and groups and organisations more widely.

On this course you will receive tailored support from a highly experienced and qualified team of psychology and professional staff who are involved in advancing practice and research regarding the prevention, effects and recovery from coercive and controlling behaviour.

You will be very well placed to advance your career in a variety of professions where the government is seeking to develop provision for the prevention of and recovery from coercive control and abuse and you will also be very well prepared to apply for a professional doctorate and research career paths in psychology and other relevant disciplines.

COURSE DETAILS
The aim of this course is to enable students to develop a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in the psychology of coercive control and controlling behaviour – its development, psychological process, effects and options for recovery.

The full-time route is structured over 12 months and comprises of three 10 week semesters. In semester 1 and 2 you will complete two taught modules in each semester. In semester 3 you will complete your dissertation under the supervision of one of the course tutors. If you choose to follow the part-time route you will complete the course over three years, completing two taught modules in each of the first two years and the dissertation in your third year.

The dissertation module on this course will also give you the opportunity to pursue an area of the psychology of coercive control directly related to your own work or interest.

FULL-TIME STUDY OPTION:

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1

Research Methods in Psychology (30 credits)
The Aetiology and Psychology of Coercive Control (30 credits)

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2

The Anatomy of Coercive Control in Comparative Contexts (30 credits)
Psychological Approaches to Recovery from Coercive Control (30 credits)

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 3

Dissertation (60 credits)


PART-TIME ROUTE:

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
The Aetiology and Psychology of Coercive Control (30 credits) 

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
The Anatomy of Coercive Control in Comparative Contexts (30 credits)

YEAR 2, SEMESTER 1
Research Methods in Psychology (30 credits)

YEAR 2, SEMESTER 2
Psychological Approaches to Recovery from Coercive Control (30 credits)

YEAR 3
Dissertation (60 credits)


POSTGRADUATE STAFF PROFILE

Dr Linda Dubrow-Marshall

Lecturer in Psychology and Programme Leader for the MSc Psychology of Coercive Control

Linda is a HCPC Registered Clinical and counselling Psychologist and a BACP Accredited Counsellor/Psychotherapist and has co-led the development of the MSc Psychology of Coercive Control. Linda also designed the in-house counselling service for the University of Salford and has worked in a variety of settings as a clinical and counselling psychologist. She researches coercive control and abuse, cultic influences, CBT and physical health, technology enhanced psychotherapy and self-care and ethical issues for psychological therapists. Linda also cofounded the Re-Entry Therapy Information and Referral Network in the UK which provides support and advice to people affected by abusive groups and relationships. She is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Dr Rod Dubrow-Marshall

Lecturer (part-time) in Psychology and Visiting Fellow in the Criminal Justice Hub and Professor in Psychology

Rod is a graduate member of the BPS (MBPsS) and is a member of the BPS Division of Social Psychology. An experienced lecturer in Psychology and researcher including in Psychology, Policy, Education and Mental Health, Rod has co-led the development of the MSc Psychology of Coercive Control. He has also worked for over 20 years in the areas of coercive control and abuse and cultic studies and undue influence and he is co-editor of the International Journal of Cultic Studies. Rod also cofounded the Re-Entry Therapy Information and Referral Network in the UK which provides support and advice to people affected by abusive groups and relationships. He was awarded his Professorial title at the University of South Wales in 2006.

Dr Simon Cassidy

Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Programme Leader for the MSc Applied Psychology (Therapies)

Is a Chartered Psychologist, Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He is an experienced teacher, receiving the Vice Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, and an experienced researcher. Current research projects include psychological resilience and self-efficacy and exploring cognitive style through brain imaging and eye movement. Cassidy, S 2012 'Intellectual Styles: Measurement and Assessment ', in: Sternberg, R J & Zang, L & Rayner, S (eds.), Handbook of Intellectual Styles: Preferences in Cognition, Learning, and Thinking, Springer Publishing Co., NY, USA, pp.67-89.q
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